Sunday

Against the wall in the South Harbour

Against the wall in the South Harbour

It’s amazing how clear the way forward looks after a good night’s sleep!
After thinking about the symptoms and phoning a friend (Ian) we agreed with the HM, who thought the problem has to lie with the fuel filters.
It seems that all the men of  ‘a certain age’, who are working around the ports, were fishermen or engineers on fishing boats up until the 90s. The decline in the fishhing industry, due to the quotas, seems to have robbed them of their true identities and, although they are happy in their jobs, they back up any advice they offer with their fishing credentials. We have met with nothing but friendliness and sound advice all the way up the East Coast.
Marcus spent the day dismantling, thoroughly cleaning and replacing the two Racor filters, aswell as the main engine filter. It seems that we have water and therefore rust in the tanks, so the problem won’t go away until, at some point in the future, we ‘bite the bullet’ and clean the tanks by hand …….. quite a messy job, but quite do-able in the right conditions. Meanwhile we will be draining the Racors on a weekly basis.

Part of the old Fraserburgh......... now high and dry

Part of the old Fraserburgh……… now high and dry

Boats in for refits and patrol duty

Boats in for refits and patrol duty

Fraserburgh, like all major fishing ports, has had to change its focus in order to survive. Across from where we were moored was a harbour full with deep sea boats, either in for repairs…..(one was in from the Faroe Isles for a refit) …… or waiting to go out on oil rig patrol. Apparently the fishing boat skippers are paid £2000 a day to patrol the pipelines ……they can’t catch enough fish to make that sort of steady money.
In the harbour we were in, there were trawlers picking up ice and fish boxes and heading out to sea

Readying for the off!

Readying for the off!

……. on the hard there were enormous boats that had been lifted on a platform and wheeled on their cradles along the quay to be worked on.

They were lifting this one as we watched.

They were lifting this one as we watched.

I was amazed to see that several of them are wooden and the labourious job of re-caulking was being done by hand!

Some job!! Look at the size of that prop!

Some job!! Look at the size of the prop!!

The town itself has some magnificent Victorian buildings reflecting its hay day……….

Gothic glory!

Gothic glory!

………..but today the number of charity shops seem to be a prime indicator of the decline of the hight street. Walking along the sea front to find the ‘out of town’ supermarkets we found a beautiful sandy beach……..lying next to a second world war base, with it’s delapidated buildings and concrete emplacements housing a variety of small industrial units. Such contrasts!

Unspoilt sandy beach and dunes

Unspoilt sandy beach and dunes

Monday

The weather for today was due to be windy so we decided to stay another night before setting off for Lossiemouth. With thee filters replaced, we tried to source some new spares, but even though we think we have a big boat everything is relative. Again we met with kind and friendly advice and left DR Filter’s portacabin armed with parts numbers for what we need to order online. After visiting three chandleries, we eventually found a small enough light to go with the horse shoe life bouy on the back of the boat.
Having stocked up the fridge and checked out the engine, we spent a lazy day ready for an early start in the morning. We went up to the HM’s office to pay for our three nights in Fraserburgh and were charged just £25. What a result!
………………….and we have our souvenir tyre marks on the fenders and topsides to remind us of our stay!!

Fraserburgh Souvenirs

Fraserburgh Souvenirs

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