Friday 16.08.13

Whether it was the wine the night before or the fact we are becoming rather blasé about these coastal hops, we somehow managed to cast off before re-attaching the wheel! A little hasty adjustment and we were away, bound for Corme

Leaving La Coruna

Leaving La Coruna

The sea was silky smooth and there was very little wind, so we hoisted the main to steady us in the Atlantic swell and motored our way towards Corme.

The sea was so calm that Marcus decided he would start to look at the anchor windlass that has failed, so with his Chief Engineer’s hat on (and dungarees), he spent some time with his head down the deck locker at the bow.

Bob the Builder, make way for Marcus the Mechanic!

Bob the Builder, make way for Marcus the Mechanic!

We saw a couple of sharks and lots of pods of dolphins, some came to play in our bow wave and some ignored us and carried on their way.
Have you ever thought about how dolphins sleep??! We did…..and found out that they shut one eye and the other half of their brain sleeps, so as they lazily make their way they really could be half asleep!

A pod that came to play

A pod that came to play. Always exciting!!

As we neared the shore and were sure there were no more dolphins about, we let the fishing line out in the vain hope of catching dinner. The sun was losing it’s heat as we approached Corme and a bank of fog followed us into harbour.

Corme

Corme

Just as we were approaching our anchorage, the fishing line began to pay out at speed. With the Captain at the wheel, there was nothing else for it, but for me to deal with the rod. While other anchored yachts looked on, I reluctantly reeled in our catch. I was curbing my instinct to run away when anything flapping comes near me and bravely hauled in our catch, which thankfully turned out to be some old rope. Not a profitable day’s fishing……must remember to reel in the line before entering port!

By the time we were anchored and ready to row ashore the fog was thick and a local man called for us to follow him to the best place to land the dinghy. After helping us to drag ‘the beast’ up the slip, he then came with us to show us where we could get something to eat. All this achieved with no english and very little spanish, but a lot of mime!

Such kindness from strangers is heart warming.

 

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