Since the last update we have spent some time getting things sorted out for the boat, sight seeing, catching colds and taking things easy!
With security in mind, we managed to get both the broken hatches fixed. All that was needed was a rivet gun and a couple of rivets…….one of the tools that Marcus doesn’t have onboard. Marcos Antonio came to our rescue yet again. Marcos speaks a little English and looks after four of the boats moored in the marina ……. and us! Anything we need, he seems to know someone who can do it. He took our laundry for his wife to do for us when we arrived and since then he we see him most days for a quick chat. He recommended a sail maker (it turns out he is the only sail maker in Recife) who has repaired both the genoa and stay sail for us.
As I said at the top, we have both had colds. Marcus, of course, has had ‘man flu’, whilst I have had a mere sniffle! so we have not ventured very far afield for a week or so.
On Tuesday, we decided to hire a car for a couple of days. Something that is a bit of a luxury for us, but as we walked across the bridge in search of the car hire shop, the stark contrast of the haves and have nots here in Recife, was clearly visible….

Favella on legs between the two major road bridges

Favella on legs between the two major road bridges

Kids playing on their bit of beach

Kids playing on their bit of beach

………..home to the cockle fishermen and women, who wade up to their chests between tides, on the mud banks the other side of the wall of the marina.

And a stone's throw away....Rio Mar Shopping Centre.....the biggest, most opulent mall we've ever been to

And a stone’s throw away….Rio Mar Shopping Centre…..the biggest, most opulent mall we’ve ever been to

The shopping centre is spotless. There are consierges on the door and valet parking available. Unlike somewhere like Bluewater, there is not a speck of litter as there are a a squad of roller skating litter pickers, armed with long handled dust pans and brushes, who swoop on any offending rubbish. Armed security guards glide around on ‘seg ways’ ……very 1984!

Having negotiated the hiring of the car……always a tricky thing as our Portuguese is not up to dealing with more specialised conversations!……. we set off for the interior, but first we had to get out of the madness of Recife’s road system. Progress  was very slow, but with jugglers and people walking up and down the lines of cars selling all manner of things, there is no chance of getting bored.

At every junction there are people selling stuff. Strawberries!

At every junction there are people selling stuff. Strawberries!

We asked the sat nav to take us to Caruaru, about 60 miles west of Recife and all seemed well as we drove along one of the main routes, however, when we pulled off the dual carriageway to get some lunch, it became apparent, as we drove round in circles on cobbled and dirt roads, that Tom Tom had no idea where we were either!

Off piste! The GPS took us here

Off piste! The GPS took us here

We eventually found our way back onto the main road and arrived, more by luck than Tom Tom’s directions, at the ‘Feira do Caruaru’ …..the biggest outdoor market of traditional crafts, clothing and ironmongery in the whole of Brazil! Just time for a quick nose around before it closed and we were off again in search of somewhere to stay for the night.

Again, relying on the sat nav for directions was frustrating and after sending us up several unmade roads and into very dodgy areas, we decided to follow road signs for the ‘Intense Motel’. We pulled up to the gates of a very modern building on the outskirts of a run down area. On checking the tariff board we realised we had arrived at a sex hotel that charged by the hour for the rooms!!!……a quick U turn and a few more minutes driving and we found the Curarua Country Park Hotel. Slightly posher than we had in mind, but once again the exchange rate worked in our favour……double room, evening meal and breakfast all for £40!!

The hotel by daylight.

The hotel by daylight.

 Outside reception, we saw this startled looking lady which started a bit of a theme to the day.

A rather surreal waterless water feature.

A rather surreal waterless water feature.

After a big breakfast, with the most varied buffet I’ve ever had the pleasure to graze at, we set off for the handicraft market in search of a hammock and some leather flip flops. The streets surrounding the market are full of street traders and we tried our first drink of coconut milk. Every coconut opened freshly and with a great deal of skill.

Green Coconut streets vendor

Green Coconut streets vendor

All fingers intact!

All fingers intact!

As well as the handcrafts, there is a a more general market. The striking difference to English markets is that all the stalls selling the same type of produce are arranged next to each other, stall after stall of hats and hammocks or hammers and hack saws. We wandered around happily for the whole of the morning and stopped for a drink at a stall that would give a H&S officer an apoplectic fit!

Market food stall...all open and daylight shining through the tiles

Market food stall…all open and daylight shining through the tiles

In the clothing area of the market and the neighbouring streets of clothing shops, there were more manikins on show than Grace Brothers could shake a stick at! They all seem to have been cast from moulds dating back to the 1950s and looked a little eerie.

Don't look now, I think I'm being followed

Don’t look now, I think I’m being followed

This season. we shall mostly be modelling the Emperor's new clothes.

This season, we shall mostly be modelling the Emperor’s new clothes.

Don't you dare come in here and buy any of our dresses.

Don’t you dare come in here and buy any of our dresses.

Here come the girls! Don't loose your heads......I did, but the selotape is holding nicely.

Here come the girls! Don’t loose your heads……I did, but the selotape is holding nicely.

Auditions for the Sound of Music?

Auditions for the Sound of Music?

Bad hair day?

Bad hair day?

'Just sit still and look natural'

‘Just sit still and look natural’

No..... This is the Bad Hair Day tableau!

No….. Tikhis is the Bad Hair Day tableau!

Completely marketed out, we set off for ‘Alto do Mouro’, billed as the biggest collection of traditional handicraft workshops in the whole of Brazil. After another sat nav melt down, we finally arrived at what resembled a ‘reservation’ complete with a ‘Ponderosa’ style entrance archway. It was practically deserted …obviously not geared up for visitors on a Tuesday…..and it felt like all that was missing was the tumble weed bowling down the street. We stopped for a late lunch at one of the restaurants that showed some life, only to find that the four people sitting at the tables were the staff and the figures at the back weren’t customers, but more life sized figures!

Alto do Mouro...... a late lunch. the dummy theme continues!

Alto do Mouro…… a late lunch and the dummy theme continues!

. We decided to make our way back home and take some less busy roads to try to find a village or small town, as all we have seen of Brasil so far are big towns and cities. We took a turning off and headed for the hills. The road surface was poor and we soon found out why. The hillsides are covered in sugar cane for as far as the eye can see and heavily laden trucks plough up and down this road, taking the cut cane to the refinery. The sides of the road were strewn with cane that had fallen off the lorries.

Sugar cane lorry and trailer

Sugar cane lorry and trailer

After about half an hour, and despite constant vigilance, we hit a pot hole and it was clear there was damage!

Two dented rims and a puncture in the front tyre.

Luckily it wasn’t quite dark and we had room to pull over safely and were able to consult the pictures in the portuguese manual to find out how to remove the wheel and put the spare on.

Ma-RAC-us to the rescue. Not a soul for miles

Ma-RAC-us to the rescue. Not a soul for miles

…….and so our adventure was over and we decided to head back to the boat and write the accident report and get it ‘google translated’ before returning the car in the morning!
Despite a less than perfect ending to the trip, we have met nothing but helpful and kind spirited people who are keen to engage with us despite the language barrier. Between them and us, we have managed to communicate and raise smiles and spirits.

After one night at Marina Pernambuco, which consisted of a buoy in the river, a pontoon to tie our dinghy to with no locked gate, a cold shower in the loos of the restaurant (with the tap so high I needed Jenni with me to switch it on) and a 10 minute walk to get a ferry across to the old town, we decided to move up river and up market to Cabanga Iate Clube.

We certainly made the right decision! It’s the swankiest marina we’ve ever been in. It has 2 pools, a sauna, a gym and 24hr security guards on the gate. The only slight draw back is that we have to get a taxi to go anywhere, but at a fiver for four of us to get to town, it’s affordable.

The bar by the little pool.

The bar by the little pool.

The first 2 days we spent walking back and forth in the old town finding the right officials, in the right order to complete checking in…..it would have been longer if we hadn’t already checked in in Fernando de Noronha!

Arriving in a new country means a day of finding the right stores to buy phone cards and data chips for the iPad and phones, so we can get on the internet. The stores always seem to be miles away from where we are and needless to say, the chips don’t work properly and we have to go back the next day to get them properly activated.

Dan saw quite a lot of Recife by the time we had done all of this, but it was a shame he didn’t get to see some of the night life and music. After spending two months with us, we had to say goodbye to him…… unlike the rest of us, he has a job to get back to. The weather has not been ‘normal’ for any of us this year and the delay leaving the Canaries meant that the big adventure of crossing the Atlantic and the equator took longer than we thought to complete, so R&R in Brazil was cut to barely three days for him.

After a couple of lazy days

A lazy day in the hammocks on the foredeck

A lazy day in the hammocks on the foredeck

and evenings by the pool cafe, Jenni and I went out into town to watch groups rehearsing in the streets for Carnival, which takes place at the end of February.. It really is a huge festival here. It lasts four days, during which time all the shops are closed, so we will have to provision for a siege……..just like Christmas in England!!

Part of the fun of new places is trying all the new foods and fruits. On her last day here, Jenni took us to a very posh churrascoria.

The salad buffet.

The salad buffet.

We should certainly have these in Britain……its a bit like a Harvester, in that you go to a salad bar to select you accompaniment to the meat, but instead of some wilted lettuce and a limited choice of unimaginative salad stuff and croutons, there is a buffet of mixed dishes of prawns, squid, beans, mushrooms, rice dishes etc. etc. to choose from. At the table, waiters bring huge skewers of barbecued meat and carve slices, which you take with small tongs and put on a side plate. We suspect that the waiters were having a bet on how much we Gringos could stuff our faces with, as they were almost racing each other to serve us the next skewer of meat!

As far as safety goes, as I said before, we have to take taxis everywhere. We can’t walk anywhere at night ….locals warn us that it’s just not done. Jenni has been very good at passing on her street wise ways……carry nothing to invite attention. Don’t carry a bag, camera or phone….. we already stand out as Gringos, so such extras are an advert and an open invitation to a would be thief. Photos are therefore proving to be a bit of a problem……cash tucked into knickers or bra is OK, but a camera would be a little obvious!

Last Sunday we went to Olinda for the day. Olinda is one of the oldest towns in Brazil and is a World Heritage Site, so I decided to be brave and take the camera. Apart from going to look at the town, we went to see the Sunday afternoon carnival rehearsals. Everywhere we went there were groups drumming, marching and dancing. It will be amazing when everyone is in costume…..can’t wait to see the real thing.

Olinda WHS

Olinda WHS

Marcus with the effigies

Marcus with some effigies

One of the drumming groups

One of the drumming groups

All ages take part

All ages take part

A bit like Edenbridge Bonfire night!

A bit like Edenbridge Bonfire night!

When we were sat watching the drumming group, they got volunteers to have a go. Naturally Jenni was there like a shot!

Our Jenn on the beat.

Our Jenn on the beat.

On Tuesday we went into Recife’s old town for ‘Terca’ Negro (Black Tuesday). In one particular church square, there is a stage set up and various bands and groups play every Tuesday in February, to celebrate the culture brought by slaves from Africa to Brazil. There was everything from rap to traditional african song and dance and in the square in front of the stage there was some ‘capoeira’ and juggling going on. It is all very vibrant and we found people wanted to talk to us to find out where we come from and to welcome us to their city and Brazil. We came away with at least two new friends on facebook!

Jenni, with stage behind, sporting the anchor earring that one of the crowd gave her!

Jenni, with stage behind, sporting the anchor earring that one of the crowd gave her!

On Thursday we took Jeeni to the airport for her flight up to the Amazon.

Bye

Bye…….

Bye Jenni!!

Bye Jenni!!

It seems very strange to be on our own again and not to have our resident translator to help us with the lingo, but we’re confident we can cope!

Today we took our bikes along the coast road to the city’s beach in Boa Viagem. Every Sunday they close one of the lanes on the main road to cars and open it for cyclists only. There are crossing marshals who stop the traffic to let bikes cross and when we reached the start of the beach, we got onto the cycle lane that runs right along the front…… a bit like Brighton, but warmer, more sun shades and ‘thin’ sand!

Refreshment stop along the prom. Bikes in the bottom left corner.

Refreshment stop along the prom. Bikes in the bottom left corner.

We pedaled on until the crowds thinned and sat on the beach for a while. It’s amazing the trading that goes on!

This man was selling prawns.

This man was selling prawns.

Everything from snacks to hats and sunglasses, jewelry to footballs and ice creams to soup. One man was struggling a little in the breeze with his stock of inflated rubber rings, airbeds and paddling pools, all carried on a frame across his shoulder.

This couple were selling dresses.

This couple were selling dresses.

Another day of new experiences and we got back in plenty of time before curfew!!

The Yacht Club from the cycle lane. We're the tall mast just right of centre!

The Yacht Club from the cycle lane. We’re the tall mast just right of centre!

Canaries

Cape Verdes

Cape Verdes to Fernando de Noronha

These are the videos Jenni has made since she’s been on board. Not bad for a first time film editor!

Fernando de Noronha 29.01.14

Well we are finally in Brazilian waters after 13 days at sea. We started out with several days of churning seas and force 6s and 7s, followed by two days sloshing in the northern doldrums and then across the equator, to pick up the SE trade winds with occasional squals and arrive here at the island of Fernando de Neronha …….. 200nm off the mainland of Brazil.

We have fallen into the rhythm of the trip and the three hour watches seem to pass much more quickly than a the start of the voyage.

We have had days of fighting to stay up right in the galley and needing to wedge ourselves into bed…….

days of endless sunshine, when sunbathing was too much of a chore and every bit of shade was bagged…….

days of motoring, ‘to give the batteries a decent charge’, but also to make progress of more than one mile an hour…..

days with squally showers, when the sails have to be reduced to allow for down draughts from variable directions, and increased again once they have passed……

………and one unforgettable day when we went ashore a cluster of rocks in the middle of the ocean!

The food has lasted …just…and, considering the temperature, very little has gone off. We still have some stiff carrots!! and we ate the last tomato last night. Taking it in turns to cook has relieved the monotony of gourmet fare every day! One of the crew is a dab hand with the can opener and the M&S Irish stew, that Steve and Helen kindly sent us off with, came into its own.

Dan making bread

Dan making bread

We have manged to cook paella, home made pizza, bread and pastry, and all those ‘staple’ potato, rice and pasta ‘surprise’ dishes, that challenge our ingenuity.

One of the more surprising 'surprise' stews!

One of the more surprising ‘surprise’ stews!

We have had the fishing line out most days, but apart from the flying fish that landed on the deck, we haven’t landed any ourselves.

One of the flying fish Marcus marinaded

One of the flying fish Marcus marinaded

One of our first trolls with the fluorescent lure was successful and we caught a MahiMahi, but the line broke just as we were about to land it……

The one that got away

The one that got away

Since stumbling across a fishing vessel, 4 days ago at São Pedro and São Paulo, we have had more than just flying fish to supplement our protein, which is now down to tinned ham, chicken, cured Spanish Jamon and chorizo ……… the freezer is still not operational.

Back on Dry Land! (Briefly)

São Pedro and São Paulo are two tiny rocks half way between the Cape Verdes and Brazil……..A tiny speck Dan found on Google Earth. They measure about the size of four football pitches and rise sharply from the sea bed. As we neared them we saw a fishing boat moored to the one buoy…..

Land Ahoy!

Land Ahoy!

A traffic jam in the middle of nowhere!

We nosed up to the boat , threw them a mooring line  and dropped back ......simple!

We nosed up to the boat , threw them a mooring line and dropped back ……simple!

Jenni’s Portuguese again came to the rescue and she contacted the fishing boat on the VHF. They put us in touch with the scientists on the island who arranged with the fishermen to take us ashore in their dinghy. There is no way that we would have ventured through the swell, between the ragged rocks and moored up to a rickety ladder and clambered ashore without their expertise.

Our 'taxi' waiting in the swell.

Our ‘taxi’ waiting in the swell.

We were welcomed by four broom stick wielding scientists who were collecting samples for research. The broom sticks had nothing to do with their research…….they carried them to ward off the vicious  pecks from nesting boobies that were breeding all over the rocks.

Jenni, broom stick in hand. making it safely to the look out point.

Jenni, broom stick in hand. making it safely to the look out point.

The Scientist's accomodation

The Scientist’s accommodation…..the front door

The back door

The back door

They came, they saw, they conquered!

They came, they saw, they conquered!

We had a tour of the island and found out a bit about life on São Pedro & São Paulo …….. The scientists and all their gear are ferried to the island from Fernando de Norunha by the fishing boat and they stay for two weeks at a time. Whilst the scientists fill their mornings with sciencie  things and their afternoons ‘chilling’, the fishing boat fishes in waters that no other boats are allowed to work around the island. After the fortnight, there is a change around and the scientists are replaced by the next lot brought by a sister ship.

The Boobies have no fear of humans, despite the broom handles.

The Boobies have no fear of humans, despite the broom handles.

One interesting fact we learnt is that the rocks are unique. They are the only place on earth where the earth’s mantle has pushed up through a fault line and created the islands. Earthquakes are a regular occurrence and we saw Richter scale sensors, but didn’t feel any shakes.

The accommodation for the scientists is spartan,

The bunk room for the scientists.

The bunk room for the scientists.

but they have wifi and masses of food supplies and drinking water all supplied by the Brazilian government, so it’s really a bit of a working holiday for them.

The scientists and the skipper and us!

The scientists and the skipper and us!

The balcony Booby

The balcony Booby

 

The three fishermen who took us over to the island were making calls home, using the station’s radio phone. When they had finished  and we set off back to the boat.

Having heard our pitiful tale of our lack of success with our fishing….. they took pity on us and we stooped off at their boat and went aboard. As we stepped aboard a man scuttled down into the ice hold and came up with a caballero (horse) fish, which was over a metre long. Our driver promptly sliced and chopped it up into 22 steaks on the deck and put them in a bin liner for us.

Slice.....

Slice…..

....chop and pop it in the bag.

….chop and pop it in the bag.

We have managed to get through most of them, fried in garlic and ginger, grilled on the plancher,  flaked and served in a coconut curry sauce and marinated fish kebabs………all very tasty! A bottle of Smirnoff seemed a fair exchange for such a magnificent fish.

Goodbye to Sao Pedro and Sao Paulo

Goodbye to Sao Pedro and Sao Paulo

We were on our way again and on the second day at about 0830 we got the champagne out of the fridge for a toast to Neptune as we crossed the equator…….

Almost there.....

Still in the northern hemisphere……

Proof that we were there.

……Now in the southern hemisphere

……we actually crossed it 3 times as we turn back and crossed it again to get the latitude caught on film.

In the evening of the third day, we saw the lights of Fernando de Noronha on the horizon. We had hoped to arrive in daylight, but the winds had pushed us on faster than estimated and so at midnight we made our way into the anchorage marked on the chart………..what the chart doesn’t show is where the local boat moorings are! I was up on the bow with the flash light and suddenly picked out a line boats just off to port…….we were lucky not to run into one of them or foul our prop on the long pick up lines to the empty buoys.

The moorings we bumbled through in the dark.

The moorings we bumbled through in the dark.

After creeping around for a while we eventually moored up to an unlit  scuba diving platform and took turns on ‘anchor watch’ until it was light enough to move to anchor.

With the dawn the looming shapes of small islands and rocky outcrops slowly took on colour and we realised what a beautiful place we had arrived in.

Daylight and the view that greeted us.

Daylight and the view that greeted us.

We were the only yacht anchored in the bay and before breakfast we were treated to a dolphin display. These islands are a dolphin breeding ground and a pod of about 50 young bucks were showing off by leaping out of the water and putting in a couple of 360s before belly flopping back into the sea and swimming away.
Jen and I went for our first swim off the back of the boat in warm water (26c) and did a bit of ‘boat babe’ sun bathing on the foredeck. Suddenly the dolphins were back with us and I got back in and swam with them

Boat Babe and Dolphin's mate. All part of a day's work!

Boat Babe and Dolphin’s mate. All part of a day’s work!

…….unbelievably exciting. I tried squeaking to them, but I’m an alto!

We went ashore and were struck by the very laid back and easy way everyone lives……a bit like the Scilies. The port officials and federal policeman were very friendly and understanding and not the least concerned when we told them we couldn’t access cash. Jenni and her ability to speak Portuguese is a great hit. By the time we had finished the signing in and out of the islands, she had been invited to a dancing party, given a cup of coffee and one of the oficials gave her his contact details!

 As we had no Reais, we couldn’t take the bus or taxi to the ATM. We started hitching, hoping for a ‘carona’ and almost immediately someone pulled up and gave us a lift. It turns out that carona-ing (giving people a lift) is commonplace and we relied on them for most of the time, as our bank cards wouldn’t work until the next day……we even got a lift from the police!

Fernando de Noronha was settled by the Portuguese, who used it as staging post for their slave trade. The old colonial official buildings and church are very grand and the old roads are made of large rock cobbles.

Colonial grandeur.

Colonial grandeur.

I felt the echo of the presence of all the slaves that must have been put to work to build them.

These islands are used as a holiday destination for wealthy Brazilians and honeymooning couples, so prices here reflect that. We knew we were going to be charged tourist taxes and inflated anchorage prices, but it was well worth every R$ (Real).

We took a walk down a track down to deserted beach and walked along ending up at one of the surfers beaches.

Amazing air roots supporting a massive tree.

Amazing air roots supporting a massive tree.

Paradise 1

Paradise 1

Paradise 2

Paradise 2

Paradise 3

Paradise 3

Paradise 4

Paradise 4

Outside the beach cafe there was a slack line……a low level tight rope….which we all had a go on. Needless to say we impressed!!

A fisherman casting his net in the breakers

A fisherman casting his net in the breakers

Whilst we privileged are sauntering around, the life for locals is not easy. We saw this guy following the birds along the beach to cast the net, slung over his shoulder, to catch whatever the birds were interested in.

30.01.14

After a delightful couple of days ashore, we set off at in the evening towards Recife.
The currents, seas and winds are very confused this close to the equator and we found swells coming from off the port bow and from behind us at the same time. The wind was blowing steadily from the SE to start with, but them came in from the south, so we ended up beating into it for the last 24hrs.

02.02.14

We finally saw the coast of Brazil emerging from the haze on the horizon. We decided to start the motor to make better time, but despite having worked perfectly the day before, it decided to stop pumping out the cooling water.
Marcus boldly went where no man wants to go……down into the engine compartment to replace the impeller (a paddle wheel in the engine that pumps sea water around the sealed cooling system). Mission accomplished, but after running for 15 minutes, water still refused to appear out of the exhaust pipe, so we decided we would have to sail as far up the river as we could before turning on the engine and hope to moor up before the engine overheated.
The coastline gradually revealed itself.

Recife looming out of the haze.

Recife looming out of the haze.

Recife is the capital city of Pernambuco State and home to 1.5 million people, so the skyscraper skyline should not have surprised me really. We had a struggle against the tide on our approach, but managed to sail into the mouth of the port and half the way to our planned mooring before turning on the engine. To our surprise and relief there was water!! I think it just likes to remind us who’s boss.

Our first night's mooring outside the Pernambuco Iate Clube.

Our first night’s mooring outside the Pernambuco Iate Clube.

08. February 2014 · Comments Off on Praia, Santiago · Categories: Sailing Blog

 

Our anchorage in Praia harbour.

Our anchorage in Praia harbour.

We anchored in the harbour in Praia, despite the guide book warnings of thefts and officialdom. There were three other boats at anchor and two more joined us including ‘Ash’ the Swedish boat we first met in Las Palmas, with Sven and Kirsten and Frederick aboard. We spotted their arrival from the restaurant where we were eating, overlooking the bay …….. great excitement!

Lunch overlooking Praia Harbour

Lunch overlooking Praia Harbour

After lunch we walked around the town and found ourselves in a pretty run down area, but did manage to buy a bottle of the local grog to give Kirsten for her birthday. It’s a shame, but because of the vulnerability of tourists, I couldn’t get my camera out, so there are no photos.

Kirsten's Birthday Melon!

Kirsten’s Birthday Melon!

Sven, Kirsten and Frederick came aboard and we celebrated Kirsten’s birthday with a birthday melon…….no time to bake a cake! The following day they all came aboard and used the halyard to swing off the front of the boat and drop into the water……..we oldies passed on that one!

'Rope swing' from the bow.

‘Rope swing’ from the bow.

The following day we got a call from Antonio……someone who one of Jenni’s contacts in London said we should get in touch with whilst here. He and his wife, Aidil arranged to come aboard in the evening. They arrived bearing a bottle of their local wine and some bread and cheese. After spending an hour or so with us, they suggested going to a restaurant. So we all hopped into their car and set off. On the way we stopped off at their house. A modern open plan, luxuriously decorated house that they had designed by a friend a year ago. The area around it looks half finished and run down, so stepping inside was a real surprise.
It turns out that Antonio is the minister for water and sanitation for the Cape Verdes and Aidil works for the ministry of education on overseas projects. Jenni always falls on her feet! We spent a lovely evening with them and enjoyed finding out more about the Cape Verdes.
When we got back to our dinghy we found our first evidence of theft…..we had chained the motor, petrol tank and the dinghy to the pontoon, but the long painter that we tie up with had been cut, so we now have a shortened painter and some local has two metres of rope!
Our last day was spent exploring the small island in the bay that had once been a leper colony. It is strange to think that an island in a prime spot has been left to decay. In Europe it would have been developed and made into a tourist attraction, but here there are more urgent priorities.

The ruined chapel on the island

The ruined chapel on the island

We left Praia at 0900 the next morning bound for Brazil.