Our route from Cabedelo to Galinhos

Our route from Cabedelo to Galinhos

After four delightful months in Jacaré, we bade our farewells on Thursday night and arrived at Galinhos on Saturday morning.

Dawn and Ian, our friends from Brighton who sailed with us through the Caledonian and Crinan canals, told us that some of their best times cruising were not when they were sailing, but when they made a lengthy stop over and became part of the community, rather than tourists.
We now know what they meant!
Jacaré Yacht Village made us welcome from the start, with Artillio there on the ‘welcome pontoon’ to take our lines and paddle around in his canoe to fish up and secure the underwater lines.
We met Brian Stevens that first day who welcomed us not only to Jacaré, but with great good humour and generosity, into his life.
In Joao Pesoa we met our ‘Mr Google’ of Brasil, Victor and Marcus’ new brother, Lito. It was delightful to spend time with Lito’s family in their homes and on the boat. Such generous and fun loving people.
We saw the arrival at the marina of the new partner, Nicholas with his wife Camilla and Gabriel, his son. We’ll remember them fondly …….Nicholas cooking us the best fillet steak we have ever eaten, playing ‘Pinky Floydy’s’ Dark Side of the Moon at top volume and helping us with the bureaucracy………Gabriel running to greet us and give us ‘Big Hugs’ and he and Marcus developing their own language………Camilla giving me the recipe for her passion fruit mousse and the best haircut I have ever had! We feel like we’re leaving part of our family behind.

Preparing to leave our mooring.

Preparing to leave our mooring.

So here we are in Galinhos,

Approaching Galinhos in the dinghy.

Approaching Galinhos in the dinghy.

a 220nm trip north and just around the top right hand corner of Brazil. The approach through a shallow channel was a little worrying, when ousr depth gauge showed 0.00metres!! We had it offset for water under the keel plus 50cms, but had clearly over estimated! Since anchoring, Marcus has plumbed the depth and adjusted the depth gauge to depth of water, so we’ll now know that at 2.3 we’ll touch bottom!
It is good to be at anchor again and, as Galinhos is a penninsula, there is no swell to contend with, so beaching the dinghy is easy on sand with very small waves. Relaunching our heavy Caribe from the beach is always tricky, so we have invested in three bits of drainpipe to lay under the keel to roll the dinghy over …… it was good enough for Stonehenge!!
We feel as though we are on holiday and on Sunday (our ‘no jobs’ day) we went for lunch and wifi at Chalé Oasis, a quirky pousada on the beach directly opposite our mooring.

The 'weather stone' at the Oasis.

The ‘weather stone’ at the Oasis.

After lunch we took a trip around the end of the peninsula in a horse carrette……the only transport, other than dune buggies and 4wd vehicles, that can be found here. image
There is no road to the village, so the only access is along the beach or by the numerous small ferry boats that ply back and forth from the jetty to the tourist car park that lies amongst the mangroves on the opposite bank.
At the jetty, there is a sign saying ‘Welcome to the most beautiful peninsula in the world’. The village is well provided for with a couple of grocery stores, clothing shops, cafés, bars and at least three pousadas (guest houses/hostels). The Main Street is cobbled, but all side streets are just sand so walking is good exercise! The horses, when not working, seem to wander free in the streets and there is a herd of goats that roam over the beach and dunes, reminding me of the goats at Passage East.
Life is good and treating us well.

Sunday afternoon at anchor.

Sunday afternoon at anchor.

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