With th the weather looking calm for a few days, we escaped from Marsh Harbour and sailed across to the nearest of the Outer Islands, Man-o-War. Although Marsh Harbour could hardly be described as a metropolis, landing in Man-o-War is like stepping back in time. Having made sure the anchor had set firmly, we lowered IKITUTU and made our way through some pretty shallow water to check out the settlement.

Man o War lagoon by dinghy.

Man o War lagoon by dinghy.

The inner ‘lagoon’ is divided in two by the inlet from the sea, allowing for deeper draft vessels to enter the west mooring field…..sadly not deep enough for us!

'Owls Nest' at the end of the MoW lagoon. My dream house!

‘Owls Nest’ at the far west end of the MoW lagoon. My dream house!

We tied up to a dock that looked free, having missed the signs on the two public docks, and strolled through the deserted streets. The roads are just wide enough for two golf carts to pass each other…..there are no cars allowed on the island…….  and the speed limit is 10mph. One bit of British legacy is that they drive on the left, but all the carts are left hand drive!!

The corner of Lovers Lane MoW.

The corner of Lovers Lane MoW.

The Bank and car park.

The Bank and car park.

We took a path that led up between the houses and only then realised just how narrow the island was as we came out onto a beach. As you can see the weather was changing!

View to the left.........

View to the left………

.......view to the right!

…….view to the right!

We managed to get back to the boat before getting the tail end of this down pour.

Back on the boat, our minds turned to the next knotty problem that IK has thrown our way. Whilst having the boards down over our bed to look at the throttle cable, we noticed that the steering cable was fraying where the water had caused some rusting. MoW is a working island and although it clearly caters for tourists, it also boasts three or four working boat yards. We decided to call in at one the following morning and see if there was a chance of replacing the cable, incase it decides to break as we approach the dreaded Jacksonville Main Street bridge!!!

We stopped by a boat that was moored at the end of Edwins Boatyard dock,to ask for advice on who to speak to. We not only got the name of the most experienced boatbuilder, but also the promise of some Mahi Mahi that the guy we asked wanted to clear from his cool box!! A fantastic result!

After our day trip round the island, (which I will get to later!), Keith, the boatbuilder offered to come out to the boat and take a look at the steering cable. Having given it a good inspection, he declared it fit enough to do the 300 miles to St Augustine, but said it did need replacing sooner rather than later!

The fraying on the steering cable. Let's hope the diagnosis is sound!!

The fraying on the steering cable. Let’s hope the diagnosis is sound!!

As I said, we decided to do a tour of the island and hired a golf cart for the day.

Our wheels for the day to explore the whole island.

Our wheels for the day to explore the whole island.

We didn’t encounter too much other traffic and as there was only one main road with side roads at right angles in the settlement, we felt sure we wouldn’t get lost. They gave us a map for the settlement, that is only about three quarters of a mile square, and then we were on our own and off piste!

Relics of the island's past.

Relics of the island’s past.

Joining the settlement end of the island and the posh second home end is a causeway that must get totally covered during storms and ultra high tides. There is a distinct  difference between the people’s buildings of the settlement and the mega rich soulless buildings at the posh end of the island.

The Low Place.......that really is its name!

The Low Place…….that really is its name!

As we took a side road off the main track, we came to the island’s new cemetery. The old one, that housed the original families that settled the island, was washed away in a hurricane and a memorial, with the names of the lost graves, has been erected. It makes interesting reading as there are only three or four surnames, but there are no two Christian names that are the same!

The new cemetery that replaced the original that was washed away in a hurricane..

The new cemetery that replaced the original that was washed away in a hurricane.

The names of the people who inhabited the original graveyard, before the hurricane.

The names of the people who inhabited the original graveyard, before the hurricane.

Continuing our tour to the posh end of the island, it was time to cool off and give the driver a rest!!

Up the posh end of the island at Manderlay.

Up the posh end of the island at Manderlay.

Island Kea at anchor.

From the private dock we found we could see Island Kea at anchor.

The golf cart in off road mode!

The golf cart in off road mode!

The following morning we returned the golf cart and decided to stay the night, before heading for the shelter of Marsh Harbour again, as strong winds and thunderstorms were forecast!

The signposting is DIY, but works just fine!

The signposting is DIY, but works just fine!

The winds arrived in Marsh Harbour and left again. We were snugly tucked up in almost the same spot we had left three days before!

Monday, being my birthday, we decided to treat ourselves to a ferry ride over to Hope Town on Elbow Cay. It was a beautiful, calm sunny day and I don’t think I’ll ever forget where I spent my 65th birthday.

The ferry dropped us on the lighthouse side of the harbour and we were soon making our way up to the top. It is the only remaining kerosene lamp, with a counterweight mechanism to turn the light, left  in the world! ( I don’t know if that is a bit like the ‘World’ series in baseball, that only has American teams!?) Anyway, there are two lighthouse keepers who have to crank the mechanism every two hours and pump the pressure chambers throughout the night!! ….worse than being on watch!

Elbow Reef lighthouse.

Elbow Reef lighthouse.

A wannabe lighthouse keeper!

A wannabe lighthouse keeper with the kerosene pressure pump.

The counterweight mechanism was built in Birmingham!

The counterweight mechanism was built in Birmingham!

Once at the top, there was a small door leading on to the balcony. A bit of a squeeze for some!

Ornate? Or a warning to hold on tight?

The door handle. Ornate? Or a warning to hold on tight?

I didn't realise I was wearing lighthouse camouflage!!

I didn’t realise I was wearing lighthouse camouflage!!

Recovering from the climb!

Recovering from the climb!

Lighthouse completed we headed off for a look a t Hope Town……..

Birthday girl appearing again!

Birthday girl appearing again!

The Main Street called The Queen's Highway!

The Main Street called The Queen’s Highway!

It's a bit like Cornwall, but no granite, only wood.

It’s a bit like Cornwall, but no granite, only wood.

Hope Town is so small you can get a glimpse of the lighthouse from most corners.

Hope Town is so small you can get a glimpse of the lighthouse from most corners.

Having walked the entire town, we returned to the harbour an Cap’n Jack’s for a birthday lunch, overlooking the water.

Lunch at Cap'n Jack's.......and yes! That is the lighthouse behind us!

Lunch at Cap’n Jack’s…….and yes! That is the lighthouse behind us!

A perfect end to a perfect birthday!

A perfect end to a perfect birthday!

Joining in with the sunset chorus of conch blowers.

Joining in with the sunset chorus of conch blowers.

We are now on our way to the US and hope to arrive in St Augustine on Thursday morning!

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